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  Report: Slave and Expert Systems

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  Introduction: The Substitution of Human Faculties with Technology: Powered Machines


The development of the steam engine in 1776 represented a major advance in the construction of powered machines and marked the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. Powered engines and machines soon became common and led to the first extensive mechanization of manufacturing processes. The development of large-scale machine production on one hand decreased the demand for craftsmen and increased the demand for semiskilled and unskilled workers and on the other altered the nature of the work process from one mainly depending on physical power to one primarily dominated by technology.




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Slave and Expert Systems
-1   Introduction: The Substitution of Human Faculties with Technology: Early Tools
0   Introduction: The Substitution of Human Faculties with Technology: Powered Machines
+1   Introduction: The Substitution of Human Faculties with Technology: Computers and Robots
+2   Introduction: The Substitution of Human Faculties with Technology: Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems
+3   Early Tools and Machines
     ...
1980s: Artificial Intelligence (AI) - From Lab to Life
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Division of labor
The term refers to the separation of a work process into a number of tasks, with each task performed by a separate person or group of persons. It is most often applied to mass production systems, where it is one of the basic organizing principles of the assembly line. Breaking down work into simple, repetitive tasks eliminates unnecessary motion and limits the handling of tools and parts. The consequent reduction in production time and the ability to replace craftsmen with lower-paid, unskilled workers result in lower production costs and a less expensive final product. The Scottish economist Adam Smith saw in this splitting of tasks a key to economic progress by providing a cheaper and more efficient means of producing economic goods.